About Dr. Julie Kohl  

 

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About Dr. Kohl

The Mitzvah of Circumcision

About the Ritual

Preparation for Brit Milah/Circumcision

Medical Benefits of Circumcision

Testimonials

Contact and Scheduling Information

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Telephone 650.269.1296
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“God then said to Abraham, “As for you, observe my covenant—you and your descendants after you—in all your generations. This is My covenant that you and and your descendants after you are to observe: let every male among you be circumcised. When the flesh of your foreskin has been circumcised, it shall be a sign of the covenant between us. And in all your generations let every eight-day-old boy among you be circumcised....” — Genesis 17:9-12

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The ritual of Brit Milah is among the oldest traditions observed by Jews today. It connects the child and his family to both God and the Jewish People. For many parents, the birth of a child creates an opportunity to consider their own relationship to their heritage and to make choices for their new family. The Brit Milah ceremony is often a first step to connecting with the Jewish community.

In the Bible, covenants generally have a “sign” (ot in Hebrew) associated with them. The sign is materially related to the content of the covenant. The sign of Brit Milah, the covenant of circumcision, is on the genitals. It reminds the participants that this is a covenant that has been entered by many generations that have come before us, and the ritual alludes to the hope that this covenant will continue for generations to come.

The Brit Milah ceremony usually takes place on the eighth day of the baby's life during daylight hours. The day the baby is born counts as the first day. Brit Milah ceremonies can take place on Sabbath and Holidays.

It is a Jewish tradition to perform tzedakah (make charitable contributions) in times of joy or sorrow. Many families choose to make a donation in honor of the occasion of their son's Brit Milah. It may be more typical to send some money to a Jewish organization, but it's appropriate to support any project that is helping to create the kind of world in which you want your son to live.

The Brit Milah does not make a child Jewish. A child is born Jewish as a result of having a Jewish parent. But the Brit Milah is the first step for parents wanting to raise a Jewish family. Subsequent steps may include celebrating Jewish holidays, providing a Jewish education, and celebrating a Bar Mitzvah.